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    1. More CEOs Should Tell Anti-Environment Shareholders to Buzz Off

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Mar 11 2014)

      More CEOs Should Tell Anti-Environment Shareholders to Buzz Off

      Apple CEO Tim Cook recently said something to a shareholder that you very rarely hear: take a hike. I’m paraphrasing, but only slightly.

      At the company’s latest shareholder meeting, a think tank, NCPPR, pushed Apple to stop pursuing environmental initiatives like investing in renewable energy. Cook went on a tirade — or at least what passes for one from the very cool and collected CEO. He made it clear that he makes choices for reasons beyond just the profit motive.

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Apple   Walmart   Tim Cook

    2. Should Big Companies Give Up on Innovation?

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Mar 11 2014)

      Should Big Companies Give Up on Innovation?

      “Why bother?”

      It’s a common question thrown at me by entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, or the more cynically minded corporate leaders.

      That is, why bother trying to innovate if no matter what they do, large companies can no longer maintain a sustainable advantage and their life spans are just getting shorter and shorter?  Isn’t it better to hasten Joseph Schumpeter’s process of creative destruction and move capital and employment from inefficient dinosaurs to more vibrant and agile upstarts?

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Australia   India

    3. How Much Do Companies Really Worry About Climate Change?

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Mar 4 2014)

      How Much Do Companies Really Worry About Climate Change?

      Are managers particularly concerned about the impacts of climate change on their businesses? If we believe the results of a recent MIT Sloan and BCG survey, the answer is no. But it may not be that dire.

      First the sobering survey results: Only 27% of respondents agreed strongly that climate change is a risk to their business — which is frightening when you think about what that says about companies’ level of readiness for the significant changes that are upon us already (extreme weather, disruptions to operations and supply chains, and the changing expectations of customers and employees). Additionally, only 11 ...

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Nike   Coca-Cola   Thailand

    4. Established Companies, Get Ready for the Collaborative Economy

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Mar 4 2014)

      Established Companies, Get Ready for the Collaborative Economy

      As more and more startups like Airbnb, Etsy and Kickstarter crowd into the space of the collaborative economy, big brands are starting to get in on the action, too.  Staples sells products developed on Quirky; Avis has acquired Zipcar; Walgreens has partnered with TaskRabbit for delivery.

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Canada

    5. Make the Most of Scarce Data-Mining Talent

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Jan 17 2014)

      The immense promise of big data to reveal new opportunities and deliver practical business results has so far been focused on technologies and models, and less on the human challenges of staffing roles and  processes to take advantage of big data’s promise. The technology may be abundant, but developing, recruiting and hiring the people to use it is becoming an acute challenge for Fortune 1000 companies.

      (Read Full Article)

    6. Is There Hope for Small Firms, the Have-Nots in the World of Big Data?

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Dec 10 2013)

      Is There Hope for Small Firms, the Have-Nots in the World of Big Data?

      Here’s a wishful vision of the future that’s even more radical than Amazon’s concept of delivery drones or Google’s robots: One day, small businesses will have access to affordable consumer data.

      Don’t yawn. This is a life-and-death issue for small businesses. Anyone who has worked in or around a supplier to a big consumer company—to a supermarket chain, for example—knows the value of information on shoppers’ preferences. If a supplier can use consumer data to shape its offerings and marketing strategies, it has a significantly better chance of survival than its data-deprived competitors.

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Google

    7. How Chinese Companies Can Develop Global Brands

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Nov 20 2013)

      How Chinese Companies Can Develop Global Brands

      China leads all emerging markets with 89 companies on the latest Fortune Global 500 list of the world’s largest. Yet it does not have a single representative on Interbrand’s list of the top 100 global brands. Also, while China’s outward-bound foreign direct investment (FDI) has grown from an annual average of below $3 billion before 2005 to more than $60 billion in 2010 and 2011, only one third of Chinese companies have seen international revenue meet expectations, according to Accenture.

      To many skeptical consumers in developed markets, Brand China still means lower quality. As has been the ...

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Texas   Beijing   Asian

    8. Six Drucker Questions that Simplify a Complex Age

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Nov 6 2013)

      Six Drucker Questions that Simplify a Complex Age

      In 1981, Peter Drucker delivered a lecture at New York University titled “Managing the Increasing Complexity of Large Organizations.” Drawing on lessons from the auto industry, banking and beyond, he offered provocative prescriptions for coping in a world in which “the real challenge is to decide what you are doing” in the face of tremendous “technological change or market change.”

      (Read Full Article)

    9. What’s Different About Enterprise IT in Africa

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Nov 6 2013)

      What’s Different About Enterprise IT in Africa

      Anyone following developments in the African IT space from afar can be forgiven for thinking that it’s all about the consumer, and that applications and services for business lag far behind. That’s understandable — the growth of the consumer mobile market in Africa has been spectacular.

      I have held the view for a while, though, that it is mobile enterprise applications, especially when adopted widely by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), that will set off the real IT boom in Africa. Recent tours in several countries have only strengthened this conviction, and made clearer to me how the coming ...

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Oracle   Africa   SAP

    10. The Pitfalls (and Upsides) of Partnering with Entrepreneurs

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Oct 18 2013)

      The Pitfalls (and Upsides) of Partnering with Entrepreneurs

      To en·gage  ( n-g j ): To pledge or promise, especially to marry; to draw into; to involve; to enter into conflict with

      Corporate executives are exhorted daily by well-meaning public leaders that they should support their local entrepreneurs in order to be good corporate citizens and to bolster local economies. But engagement with entrepreneurs is not a question of conscience or moral imperative; it is a question of strategic self-interest.

      (Read Full Article)

    11. When You’re Innovating, Think Inside the Box

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Oct 8 2013)

      When You’re Innovating, Think Inside the Box

      A company noticed a strange anomaly: One of its manufacturing plants had a significantly lower scrap rate. That little finding and its consequences illustrate a point that managers often overlook in their search for innovation: Sometimes it’s better to think inside the box.

      Companies spend a lot of time and effort trying to adapt ideas from other industries and other disciplines, but I would guess there’s at least one idea lurking within your own company that you could use to great advantage. That’s why I say think inside the box – the box being your organization. Of course ...

      (Read Full Article)

    12. Three Signs That You Should Kill an Innovative Idea

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Sep 24 2013)

      Three Signs That You Should Kill an Innovative Idea

      Whether you’re a digital start-up or an institutional entrepreneur, three simple heuristics offer an excellent way to determine whether a fledgling innovation initiative should be put out of its misery (and yours).  Even if the innovation business case appears compelling and its numbers sound, should these three pathologies appear, don’t hesitate or delay: Kill your innovation effort ASAP.

      1) No Pleasant Surprises

      Almost all innovation efforts have the hiccoughs and bumps in the road. Design schedules invariably slip and that “quick-and-dirty” prototype ends up costing much more than expected. That’s normal. But listen closely for and pay ...

      (Read Full Article)

    13. The Danger of Wellness Programs: Don't Become the Next Penn State

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Aug 20 2013)

      The Danger of Wellness Programs: Don't Become the Next Penn State

      Penn State University's wellness program has become every human resources director's worst nightmare: national news. Partly this is because two of the school's professors — Matthew Woessner and Brian Curran — did a much better job organizing their colleagues in opposition to the wellness program than, for example, CVS employees did when they were subject to a similarly intrusive program.   But also partly this was because Woessner and Curran struck a chord with millions of employees everywhere who have started posting similar stories of invasion of privacy, misinterpreted lab values, unnecessary test expenses, and even loss of low-cost insurance ...

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      Mentions:   Walmart

    14. The Problem with Procurement

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Aug 2 2013)

      The Problem with Procurement

      Back in 1983, in a Harvard Business Review article, Peter Kralijc called for the procurement function to take on a larger and more strategic role in managing the supply chain. Thirty years on, sales people in most large companies are still being trained in ways to actually bypass procurement folks in their customer companies. This is not evidence of people taking the function seriously. What went wrong? To find out, we conducted a survey with close to 200 procurement executives, in Asia and in Europe. We found pretty conclusively that procurement managers are their own worst enemy, both with external ...

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Asia

    15. Five Ways to Innovate Faster

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Jul 30 2013)

      Five Ways to Innovate Faster

      One of the most common complaints senior executives have about disruptive innovation is its seemingly snail-like pace. How is it, they wonder, that it takes us forever to pursue ideas that promise to create new markets when the world seems to be innovating at a dizzying pace? This frustration is compounded by the fact that the usual levers senior executives use to get things to go faster — creating tight deadlines, flooding the project with resources, checking in more frequently — don't seem to work, and in many cases cause teams working on disruptive ideas to actually go slower. Why is ...

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      Mentions:   IBM

    16. Research: Why Companies Keep Getting Blind-Sided by Risk

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Jul 17 2013)

      Research: Why Companies Keep Getting Blind-Sided by Risk

      After tsunamis, protests, wildfires, and riots — to name just a few recent major disruptions — few managers can be unaware of companies' vulnerability to the vagaries of politics and extreme weather.  You'd think. Yet three quarters of the 195 large companies surveyed recently by APQC got hit by an unexpected major supply chain disruption in the last 24 months. We are talking here about an unforeseen event involving a physical asset owned by the enterprise or a third party. Major means an event that has the potential to severely interrupt a business' ability to deliver on its promises to customers ...

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Texas   New York

    17. The Other Women's Movement: Factory Workers in the Developing World

      Explore HBR Blog Network (May 25 2013)

      The Other Women's Movement: Factory Workers in the Developing World

      Factory jobs give millions of women what they can't get anywhere else: a salaried wage. With it, they can begin to exert control over their future. Factory work isn't just about making clothes; it's also about a potential path toward gender equality. Women outnumber men in factory jobs in the global supply chain. Are they risking their lives or improving their livelihoods?

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Africa   Asia   Egypt

    18. Sustainability Matters in the Battle for Talent

      Explore HBR Blog Network (May 20 2013)

      Sustainability Matters in the Battle for Talent

      New research shows that employees want to work for companies that make sustainability a priority.  Bain & Company recently surveyed about 750 employees across industries in Brazil, China, India, Germany, the UK, and the U.S. Roughly two-thirds of respondents said they care more about sustainability now than three years ago, with almost that many saying sustainable business is extremely important to them. Interest peaks among employees age 36 to 40 — a young group but not the youngest. Employees expect employers to step up and nurture this growing interest.

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   India   Brazil   Germany

    19. From BP to Boeing, Supplier Safety Is the CEO's Problem

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Mar 1 2013)

      From BP to Boeing, Supplier Safety Is the CEO's Problem

      The current sub-contractor controveries surrounding BP's liability for the gulf explosion and Boeing's grounding of its 787 Dreamliner should not obscure an ultimate take-away for corporate leaders: companies must take operational responsibility for ensuring that products and services provided to them by third party suppliers are safe, effective and of high quality.   In this era of complex supply chains and the hiring of expert sub-contractors, taking such responsibility is crucial for preventing events with the potential to adversely affect the corporation and its reputation.

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Boeing

    20. The Inside Story of Diageo's Stunning Carbon Achievement

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Feb 19 2013)

      The Inside Story of Diageo's Stunning Carbon Achievement

      How the company's North American division cut emissions by 80%.  This is the exclusive, short story of how Diageo North America, with creativity and guts, both in operations and in the senior ranks, achieved the holy grail of carbon emissions reductions. They did it without using carbon offsets — and about 38 years earlier than they had to. Here's what scientists are telling us: the world must cut carbon emissions by at least 80 percent from 1990 levels by 2050 to (we hope) avoid the worst of climate change.

      (Read Full Article)

    21. Building Customer Communities Is the Key to Creating Value

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Feb 1 2013)

      Building Customer Communities Is the Key to Creating Value

      What are your customers telling their friends and colleagues about your business? Your prospective customers and buyers increasingly learn about you from their peers — including your current customers — while tending more and more to ignore traditional sales and marketing communications from corporate. Companies are now taking advantage of this new marketing reality, becoming more skilled at getting their customers to advocate for them, create peer influence in their markets, and make important contributions in areas like product development and services.  You're denying the new marketing reality if you're not encouraging social capital.

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Apple   Microsoft

    22. What Makes Social Entrepreneurs Different

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Jan 10 2013)

      What Makes Social Entrepreneurs Different

      When social entrepreneurs say that they want to "work themselves out of a job" they are not making a glib statement to sound cool. They are merely stating the obvious — they want to fundamentally solve the problem that their solution is designed to address.  Commercial entrepreneurs are different. They're out to standardize a business model. That model might solve a social problem — but if it's profitable and doesn't fix the problem, that's okay, too.

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Africa

    23. To Grow, Social Enterprises Must Play by Business Rules

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Jan 9 2013)

      To Grow, Social Enterprises Must Play by Business Rules

      We can't ask social enterprises to have a big impact if they can't get the resources they need to grow bigger. In Britain, for example, fewer than 10% of the tens of thousands of social enterprises generate more than £1 million in revenue. Why is that?  One reason is that the scrappy, entrepreneurial approach that characterizes many of these organizations starts to break down as they pass that threshold.

       

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   London   Britain

    24. It's Time to Wage an All-Out War on Waste

      Explore HBR Blog Network (Dec 11 2012)

      It's Time to Wage an All-Out War on Waste

      In 1996, James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones popularized the term "lean thinking". It was their expression for what they'd observed studying Toyota's manufacturing operations: an absence of waste. Today, lean concepts have moved beyond the factory floor to become an organizing set of principles and practices applicable to all business operations and activities, including entrepreneurial start-ups.  Here's seven targets for keeping your innovation efforts lean:

      (Read Full Article)

      Mentions:   Toyota   Apple

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